Dale Carnegie was the best-selling author of the 1936 classic. How to Win Friends and Influence People. His other classic written in 1948 was How to Stop Worrying and Start Living.  He wrote it because in his own words he "was one of the unhappiest lads in New York". On this podcast, I run through some of his principles and tips laid out in the book. These include:

  • “Don’t stew about the future. Just live each day until bedtime”.
  • The next time trouble hits, think what’s the worst that can happen, mentally prepare for the worst, then calmly try to improve upon the worst
  • Once decided, act – don’t think about outcomes
  • “Unjust criticism is often a disguised compliment. It often means you have aroused jealousy and envy”
  • “Count your blessings – not your problems!”

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also, make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

Even though I'm a Liverpool fan, I have to admire Sir Alex Ferguson. He managed the English soccer club, Manchester United, from 1986 to 2013. During that time, he won the league a record 13 times, which was considerably more than the next most successful manager of an English club: Liverpool's Bob Paisley, who won the league six times. In total, he won 38 footballing trophies  - which on some measures makes him one of the best coaches of any sport of all-time.

So what was the secret of his success? Based on interviews of him and on his own writings, I've found a number of traits that stood out. On this podcast, I discuss them. They include his desire for constant renewal, a strong work ethic, prioritising the team over individual stars, focusing on the next win, being decisive, obsessing about football and sheer passion. 

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also, make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

 

If you read the personal writings of Bruce Lee, you’ll discover an incredibly deep individual. He was not only a master of the physical, but he was also a master of the spiritual. This is reflected in his famous quote:

“You must be shapeless, formless, like water. When you pour water in a cup, it becomes the cup. When you pour water in a bottle, it becomes the bottle. When you pour water in a teapot, it becomes the teapot. Water can drip and it can crash. Become like water my friend.”

He elaborated on this by describing the “The Six Diseases” to avoid:

  1. The desire for victory
  2. The desire to resort to technical cunning
  3. The desire to display all that you have learned
  4. The desire to overawe the enemy
  5. The desire to play a passive role
  6. The desire to get rid of whatever disease you are likely to be infected with

In this podcast, I talk about these and the journey Bruce Lee took to arrive at them.

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also, make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

“Weniger Aber Besser. Less But Better” This was said by Dieter Rams and best sums up his approach. Rams was the Chief Design Officer at Braun, the German consumer products group, from 1961 until 1995. His approach has influenced much of today’s design thinking, most notably at Apple.

In late 1970s, Rams asked himself “is my design good design?” and he answered with his ten principles of good design:

1 Good design is innovative

2 Good design makes a product useful

3 Good design is aesthetic

4 Good design makes a product understandable

5 Good design is unobtrusive

6 Good design is honest

7 Good design is long-lasting

8 Good design is thorough down to the last detail

9 Good design is environmentally-friendly

10 Good design is as little design as possible

In this podcast, I discuss four that have resonated with me and how we can generalise them to apply to other parts of our life.

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

 

Recently I’ve had my head stuck in old books of wisdom like the works of Plato, the bible and the Bhagavad-Gita. I thought I’d extract lessons from these ancient texts that could be useful for the hyper-modern world of today.

It really did jolt me awake. What stood out were the constant exhortations not to be so self-centered. This touched me because I think I’ve fallen into the trap of over-focusing on me, whether it’s finding health hacks, optimising my productivity or finding personal happiness. It’s all about me, me, me and not about others. In this podcast, I summarise some of the key lessons and describe how we can rebalance our lives to think more about others.

For more detailed notes click here

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

Over the years, I’ve had good managers and bad managers and I myself have been a bad manager and a good manager. Through these experiences, I’ve found the advice of Peter Drucker the most transformative. Drucker was one of the first management gurus, and his 1967 book “The Effective Executive” has to be the best management book ever written. 

On this podcast, I’ve going to run through the key elements from his approach that made a difference for me and share Druckers insights on important aspects of corporate life.  I talk about his 5 core practises for becoming super effective executive:

  1. Know where your time goes.
  2. Focus on outward contribution.
  3. Build on strengths, not weaknesses.
  4. Concentrate on the few major areas where superior performance will produce outstanding results.
  5. Make effective decisions. 

For more detailed notes click here and here

I hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

In this episode, I will highlight some of the useful life tips I’ve picked up from various books over the years. Here are 11 quotes that capture the tips:

  1.  Demote the importance of email. Your inbox is other people’s priorities (Craig Jarrow, Time Management Ninja)  
  2. To make networking successful, follow up is everything (Jayson Gaignard, MastemindTalks).
  3. Scaling requires grinding it out and pressing each person, team, group, division or organization to make one small change after another (Robert Sutton, Hayagreeva Rao, “Scaling Up Excellence”) . 
  4. Any fool can criticize, condemn and complain – and most fools do (Dale Carnegie, “How to Win Friends and Influence People”)
  5. Unless you give at least forty-five minutes to careful, fatiguing reflection (it is an awful bore at first) upon what you are reading, your ninety minutes a night [of reading] are chiefly wasted (Arnold Bennett, “How to Live on 24 Hours a Day”). 
  6. The acid test for creativity is simply stated: has the domain in which you operate been significantly altered by your contribution? (Howard Gardner, “Five Minds for the Future”)  
  7. Keeping things “just in case” indicates a lack of trust in the future…Good things cannot easily come into your life if you block the flow of energy by persistently clinging to outdated clutter (Karen Kingston, “Clear Your Clutter with Feng Shui”) 
  8. Judging is what the mind does, I discovered. But what you can begin to do is write your judgments down and question them. That will give you a sane and happy life (Byron Katie, “Who Would You Be Without Your Story”). 
  9. Great presenters have the ability to tell you something you already know, in a way that gives it new and more powerful meaning (Jon Steel, “Perfect Pitch: The Art of Selling Ideas and Winning New Business”).
  10. What we fear doing most is usually what we most need to do (Timothy Ferriss, “The 4-Hour Work Week”).
  11. “Politics is when people choose their words and actions based on how they want others to react rather than based on what they really think” (Patrick Lencioni, “The Five Dysfunctions of a Team: A Leadership Fable”). 

Hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

It’s one of the seven deadly sins and in some traditions it’s thought to be the   root of all evil. In this podcast, I delve into envy. What it is, how it affects us all, and how to curb its impact.

I talk about the six causes of envy: egotism, arrogance, fear, ambition, loathing of people and vengeance. I also discuss four cures to envy. For detailed written notes, click here

 

Hope you find this helpful. You can subscribe to my podcast on iTunes, Stitcher, Overcast, Spotify or wherever you get your podcasts. Just search for “Deep See With Bilal”. Also make sure to rate and review this podcast and enjoy! 

Bilal

I’ve worked in so many teams over the years at all levels. What’s interesting is that some teams have operated really well, while others have been truly dysfunctional.

Perhaps the best work on this is that of Patrick Lencioni. He describes how teams suffer from 5 dysfunctions,  they

  1. lack trust
  2. fear conflict
  3. lack commitment to decisions
  4. avoid holding each other to account
  5. do not pay attention to team results.

He sees this a pyramid starting with trust at the base and inattention to team results at the apex. In this podcast, I run through these and how to correct for them. For more details beyond the podcast you can read my blog on the teams. 

Bilal

There are some areas of life that appear to lend themselves to training and systems, such as using spreadsheets, law, accounting and medicine. 

But for things like coming up with new ideas or creativity we rely on luck or inspiration. However, there is a way to systematise this. Inspired by a book from the 1940s, in this podcast, I describe a 5-step process for idea generation.

They are in order:

  1. Gathering knowledge.
  2. Reflecting until you are exhausted.
  3. Distracting yourself away from the problem.
  4. Let the magic happen as the idea comes out of nowhere.
  5. Exposing the idea to the world of healthy criticism.

I’ve been using this system and it works. 

Enjoy

Bilal

 

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